How Real-Time Smart Apps can Ensure a Safe Return to Work

Smart thermometers may test an employee's temperature before allowing them to enter a building and deactivate their building pass if they are deemed a danger.

Fremont, CA: Businesses planning for employees' return to work discover that they need a plethora of new smart systems focused on real-time technology. If businesses are to return to pre-pandemic levels, they will need programs that protect workers and tourists in particular. The variety of required systems and applications complicates matters and makes implementation difficult.

Facilities Management 

When workers return to work, cleaning will be necessary. Solutions in this category can make use of technologies such as:

Smart scheduling: To help prevent the spread of COVID, the room used after each meeting should be wiped down. A smart scheduling approach may be beneficial. When you reserve a conference room or meeting area, you immediately notify facilities management and arrange cleaning after the meeting is over.

Mobile app guidance: Cleaning teams can no longer adhere to a timetable as they did prior to the pandemic. They will be required to clean up after each meeting and to respond on-demand to any situation that necessitates additional sanitization. Cleaning workers can be guided to their next assignment using mobile apps developed by facilities management departments.

Social Distancing 

The difficulty here is determining how to track distancing, offer feedback to staff, and implement policies in real-time. Solutions to social distancing can employ a variety of technologies, including:

Screening: Smart thermometers may test an employee's temperature before allowing them to enter a building and deactivate their building pass if they are deemed a danger.

Proximity sensing: Proximity sensors embedded in smartphones and wearables will provide personal digital assistants information with real-time information about crowding conditions.

Computer vision: Smart cameras that use AI to observe crowds could provide data to applications like occupant counting and wait-time metering, as well as send warnings when people get too close to each other indoors or out in public.

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