Trends in Smart Buildings that are on a Roll in 2022

Smart building technology promises to play a critical role as governments around the world continue to set ambitious energy conservation targets in an effort to minimize the global carbon footprint

Fremont, CA: Intelligent buildings are at the forefront of commercial real estate innovation. Much of this revolution is based on unprecedented data influxes brought about by the Internet of Things (IoT), which reveal fine-grained insights into prior unknown aspects of building operations. A smart building adds new levels of automation as well as command and control by combining IoT data with existing building systems and other data sources.

In this article, we identify some trends and applications that are most talked about:

Managing Smart Energy

Despite increasing utility costs and environmental challenges, the quest for greater energy efficiency in building operations shows no signs of abating. Smart building technology promises to play a critical role as governments around the world continue to set ambitious energy conservation targets in an effort to minimize the global carbon footprint.

Many commercial buildings today waste significant amounts of energy due to unnecessary HVAC and lighting activities. Greater efficiency can be achieved with decentralized, on-demand equipment control that takes into account occupants' behaviors and preferences, as well as real-time indoor conditions at discrete zones, using IoT data as a feedback loop. Simultaneously, wireless sub-metering systems provide granular insights into electric, water, and gas consumption, allowing abnormal usage trends to be identified and waste sources to be identified.

Agile Smart Workspace

Emerging work trends such as activity-based working, remote work, and co-working have swept the globe. And their prevalence has only grown in the aftermath of the global health crisis. The modern workplace is positioned to evolve as businesses embrace new ways of working and employees' priorities shift.

Firms and building owners can effectively gauge how different areas of the office space are being used using IoT occupancy and traffic flow data. With this knowledge, they can make informed decisions about space layouts to maximize utilization while encouraging innovation and collaboration. Organizations can, for example, better right size meeting rooms and configure the optimal mix of open, cooperative space and individual, focus zone based on actual demand. Similarly, innovative models such as hot-desking or flex space can be introduced to increase space efficiency and meet the demand for more fluid, agile work environments.

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