What You Need to Know About Smart Building and Cybersecurity

What You Need to Know About Smart Building and Cybersecurity

Connectivity is now a required component of any building's infrastructure, and as businesses prepare to return as a dispersed workforce dispersed between satellite offices, headquarters, and homes, technology will become the ultimate enabler of business continuity post-pandemic.

Fremont, CA: Intelligent technologies are the lifeblood of modern existence. People have grown increasingly reliant on smart technology and the benefits they provide in both their personal and professional lives.

Smart homes are inspiring, sustainable, cost-effective, and future-proof settings designed to provide extraordinary levels of engagement and happiness to today's and tomorrow's users. The most advanced smart technologies are all designed to collect, capture, and analyze data, which is then utilized to provide more intuitive individualized experiences for its consumers. However, the more complex the technology, the more data it collects and the more responsibility it imposes on building owners.

Smart buildings and cybersecurity

 

Connectivity is now a required component of any building's infrastructure, and as businesses prepare to return as a dispersed workforce dispersed between satellite offices, headquarters, and homes, technology will become the ultimate enabler of business continuity post-pandemic.

 

However, all of the benefits and advantages that smart, technologically advanced buildings provide come with danger. Because smart buildings have a larger digital surface area, they are more vulnerable to cyber attacks, and even the tiniest breach can swiftly affect entire networks and buildings.

 

With cybercrime up 600 percent since the start of the pandemic and attackers' sophistication growing, it has never been more critical for landlords to prioritize establishing cybersecurity. Given that every smart property generates massive amounts of data, landlords must be able to securely collect, analyze, and use it without jeopardizing security.

 

Security cameras, doorbells, nanny cams, and even refrigerators can be used by hackers as entry points. To appreciate how much of a threat President Biden's Peloton would pose, consider how they were deemed too hazardous to bring into the White House. It's like keeping a little window open downstairs. Everything that is network-connected, whether smart lights, connected CCTV, or even the elevator network, must adhere to the same demanding security protocols and practices as databases containing secret company data or mission-critical software. This entails putting in place the necessary protocols and standards to guarantee the building's systems and data are secure.

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